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's set to hit the market in the next few weeks. the ceo of protein sciences joins us with a look at the new drug and what it could mean for the company as it now looks to go public. david: 2012 was a massive year for the markets with the s&p posting its largest gain in three years. will it continue? what's the best play to play it? >> here with a first on fox business look at the firm's 2013 outlook is chad morganlander portfolio manager at stifel nicolaus. thanks for coming on. >> thank you for having me. >> all right, so break it down for us here. what does 2013 look like? what's your outlook? >> well, it is going to look similar to 2012 for the united states for the first quarter or two and then you should see a reacceleration in 2013. capital spending in the united states should improve, household credit growth, home prices are going to start getting a lift, home sales which will be a self-sustaining recovery, something that you haven't seen for several years. david: but after-tax income is going down, is it not? >> well, it will, but historically the consumer has the ability
co-author who is professor of political science at harvard. many years ago when we repose at princeton university, we co-taught a course at the public policy and that led to his co-authored several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, you get to vegetative examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you work, walk us through this. >> guest: this is a tale of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, bu
change and the announcement of science deniers was lauded by the left. of course it had to be. let's listen to the president say something that i don't think has been said before. >> we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to the ourselves but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> well, rush limbaugh challenged him today because people were listening to rush are driving cars and using up fossil fuel and they're not driving smart cars or priuses. no, they're driving big gas burners, but the fact is there's still that sort of no-nothingism, if you will, that -- i'm trying to think of the great word. you don't believe in anything. ludd
with a science-type -- as somebody with a science-type background i took offense at that. i would challenge him to show us the linkage, the undeniable linkage between drought and change of weather and some kind of human activity. >> it's not like you're an m.i.t. graduate. oh, wait, you are. i think it was a message, not to congress but to whoever will be running the e.p.a. for the president. i don't see any of that language passing through the house and so it'll be via rule and reg, executive order potentially through the white house. the m.i.t. grad does bring up the science today as we sit on the 40th anniversary of roe v. wade, i find it amazing that the unmistakable scientific and biological evidence of the humanity of a -- an unborn child is denied by the white house while we have this debate over other science as well. >> clear think the administration likes to use regulatory agencies as a bludgeon to play to his constituencies. if the leadership wants to make sure i would vote for this debt ceiling increase, they could achieve the rains act to it, which my predecessor geoff davis got pa
are looking at fourth and eighth graders, fourth graders in reading and mathematics and science and eight the greatest in mathematics and science. >host: we have special number set up if you want to join this conversation -- what do we learn as we dig into help fourth graders and eighth graders are doing? guest: the broad strokes over view, we see that our fourth graders, they're reading has improved as well as mathematics but their silence is largely not changed compared to the previous administration. over the longer term, they have improved and their eight th graders have not improved much. in general, the assessments compare the u.s. to a variety of countries and education systems within countries. some of our state's took the assessment independently along with the u.s. total. when you look over the entire set, i would say the u.s. among these countries shows up in the top 10 or 12 countries or systems. host: we can see who was included in the fourth grade reading study. why these countries? guest: they are given the same tests so much of the efforts in an international asset as maki
our children and future generations. some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging firesser and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> michael: but will policy follow words this time? will mitigating the effects of climate change be a hallmark of president obama's second term? he did say climate change. joining me now to discuss the progressives reaction to president obama's speech is donny fowler, uea graduate. he runs his own political firm here. donny as always great to have you back inside "the war room." before we get into the nitty-gritty, what did you think of the president's speech. >> it was great. president obama has learned a lot of lessons about being in washington, d.c. you have to stand up, say what you want and fight hard for it. you can't sit back and wait for them to come to you. >> michael: i hear and i agree. i thought it was fantastic speech. >> it wasn't a liberal speech. we'll tax any estates over $1 million. we're going to put a carbon tax on any carbon. we're going to legalized drug
and the rest of the world. we can only build on science. you have to work with government supporters business, parliamentarians, with any stakeholder that understands and is willing to engage in education and managing risk for the future. the first product to the first idea that people that got together in the early parts of the decade serenade instrument for international cooperation. that is key here. they started working on what became the framework for action. i hope at least 10% of you have heard about this. maybe. i'm used to it not being very familiar, but i'm also very used to that people now ascendant when we start describing it. the framework for action was sick to duration of the previous details. there have been neo, strategy, which was strongly science-based, so there's other strategies, but the new strategy was really about globalization. it was really setting a framework for what outcome, both leinster to shoot goals and priorities in the sense of the people who put this together on the site thinks he will be in a safer a safer world. the adoption of the framework for action ha
to rebuild it that way. this is the last part, from the science perspective. here's my ask. who's making the decisions about where we build, how we build? and if in a summit with the united states you're going to think it's the federal government. no. some of you might think it's the state government. not really. where do these decisions get made? local officials. whether their city or county commissions, land-use planning board. this is where the decisions are made every day wear, added up, the risk exposure occurs, but on a day-to-day translational basis you probably don't see this. but this is where decisions are made about where we build, how we build, types of building codes were going to enforce. right? yet many of these officials under tremendous pressure, particularly on the downturn that generate revenue how well the generate revenue? jobs and growth. have you ever seen anybody running for office thing i want our community to get smaller? it's always jobs and growth. that's like a mantra. that's how we go tax bases. they're having to make decisions that oftentimes our short-term
school matsh and science performance across the state increased. [applause] . i know that we have many of our state superintendents in attendance, please. if you would please rise and be recognized for t hard work that you do. [applause] these are small steps, but they're steps to buildn, and we will. wh we can never do though, is fall backwards. my pledge to parents, students and educators is to always move ahead. of coue, our efforts to improve education cannot focus only on the very young. the nevada system of higher education has been an important part of our state's success since its founding. and it has become an even more important player in our economic development efforts. i am pleased and honored to have the hancellor, both as a member of my cabinet a as an active member of the state economic development board. mr. chancellor, i know you're here. if you'd please stand. [applause] with the chancellos support, we are creating new courses of study at unr and unlv focused specifically on the sectors we are targeting for economic growth. unlv is working with my office of economic
conference on science, policy, and environment. my name is peter -- i'm the executive director of the national council on environment. it is my honor to be the master of ceremonies for much of this conference. thank you for coming. lot of people are still outside. i encourage them to come in and settle themselves down. so super hurricane sandy, the drought in the midwest, and the impact on agricultural, wild fires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 2011 we had more disasters in the united states costing over a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had even more expensive diasters but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. so disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely will much, much greater cost. we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of with practitioners, policy makers from the international to the local level, with conservation -- with corporations
creates social change. it takes everything from science to faith. it is that fertile place right in the middle we really exceptional campaigning happens. and that is why i strive to be. i would like to do this in memoriam. may she rest in peace. the next item, a number of you have heard about. that is, a charter amendment that i am introducing today that is get the six votes we'll put a measure on the ballot before the voters of the city and county of san francisco to give the opportunity to rename our airport the harvey milk san francisco international airport. a lot of has been said about the renaming of the airport. the one thing i'm committed to is to make sure that we have an open and transparent process. all of us as individuals, whether we think about it or not, have a special relationship with our city's airport. while it is important for me, and this approach was to make sure that whatever happened, at the end of the day we gave the voters of the city and county of san francisco, the ultimate say. i would like to thank my colleagues on the board who have signed on as
difficult things to do in natural science, forecasting winter storms. we came close. it drew in cold rair. but going back over the last hours, heavy snow western north carolina, southern central virginia. ocean city just after midnight. getting a few scattered flurries now passing through northern prince george's county into anne arundel. farther north and west getting a few scattered flurries as well as in frederick. how much snow fell? a dusting to an inch or two. parts of the northern neck near charlottesville. they got 2 to 6 inches of snow in southeastern and southern virginia and southwestern virginia got 8 to as much as 14 inches of snow there. temperatures now cold, in the mid to upper 30s most of the region. the wind picking up a bit too. winds will increase throughout the day. gusting to 30 miles per hour through midday and early afternoon. we'll stay in the 30s throughout the day. i'm back with your friday evening planner in ten minutes. a look at traffic now with danella. good morning. >> good morning. still pretty quiet out. happy friday to you. if you're about to head on the
sports and all society have to reckon with at some point is the fact that the technology and science are going to raise these questions over and over again as we go forward. because it's not totally clear where you start -- where you draw the lines. right now we think tommy johns surgery is okay, even though you come back with a stronger arm than you had before. that's a medical enhancement. that's not something that's part of your natural gift. that's something that you earned. at some point we'll have laser surgery that will allow them to see better. is that a drug? is that something you should be allowed to have or not? people will be able to do things scientifically, technologically to their bodies to make them better performers without any effort. so where do the lines get drawn? how do we figure out how to cope with the march of science? >> like a futurologist. >> last month bartolo colon, came back from a 93 miles an hour. >> that's okay but hgh isn't. again, where do the lines get drawn? >> the reason i'm here today is because i had my blood spun last night. >> juicing. >> i'
been a time of proud achievement. we have made enormous strides in science and industry and agriculture. we have shared our wealth more broadly than ever. we have learned at last to manage a modern economy to assure its continued growth. we have given freedom new reach. we have begun to make its promise real for black as well as for white. we see the hope of tomorrow in the youth of today. i know america's youth. i believe in them. we can be proud that they are better educated, more committed, more passionately driven by conscience than any generation in our history. no people has ever been so close to the achievement of a just and abundant society, or so possessed of the will to achieve it. and because our strengths are so great, we can afford to appraise our weaknesses with candor and to approach them with hope. standing in this same place a third of a century ago, franklin delano roosevelt addressed a nation ravaged by depression and gripped in fear. he could say in surveying the nation's troubles -- "they concern, thank god, only material things." our crisis today is in reverse. we
, historian richard norton smith. the cover story of "christian science monitor" - a look inside as some of the more famous second terms richard norton smith is talking about. vietnam was lbj. a call from the bronx, new york. caller: if the losing presidential candidate is not an office holder, does he get to participate in the inauguration? will mitt romney be there? host: we know that mitt romney will not be here tomorrow, neither president bush. guest: president bush 41 is just out of the hospital. i wonder if jimmy carter -- host: he will be in attendance, as well as bill clinton. immy carter is 87. -- jimmy carter is 87. guest: that is a relatively new tradition. herbert hoover was invited to the kennedy inaugural in 1961. he was a very close friend to the president's father. the weather was so bad that he really could not get here. but he intended to be here. host: ronald reagan had the warmest and coldest inauguration days. 1981 and 1985. guest: the great story about the weather -- william howard taft, who had this self deprecatory sense of humor -- there was a blizzard. he said,
listeners. we're talking with author, historian richard norton smith. the cover story of "christian science monitor" - a look inside as some of the more famous second terms richard norton smith is talking about. a call from the bronx, new york. caller: if the losing presidential candidate is not an office holder, does he get to participate in the inauguration? host: we know that mitt romney will not be here tomorrow, neither president bush. guest: president bush 41 is just out of the hospital. i wonder if jimmy carter -- host: he will be in attendance, as well as bill clinton. guest: that is a relatively new tradition. herbert hoover was invited to the kennedy inaugural in 1961. he was a very close friend to the president's father. the weather was so bad that he really could not get here. but he intended to be here. host: ronald reagan had the warmest and coldest inauguration days. guest: the great story about the weather -- william howard taft, who had this self deprecatory sense of humor -- there was a blizzard. he said, i always thought it would be a cold day when i would be elected a pr
judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fire. that's good night to those republicans who don't believe in science. there was a critique, was there not, of his political opponents? >> there was, but i thought what he did so beautifully was to bring it back together to core american values when he talked about the oath that i take is like the oath they take is like the oath that men and women take when they sign up for our military is like the oath that men and women or that woman who fulfills her dream to become an american citizen takes, to remind everybody that all of these things are connected. this was a broader theme that we were talking about during this election. we are all in this together. it is not you're on your own, and that's part of why. that's what social security means. that's what the name calling and these other things that he referenced mean. we are all in it together. >> we're just going to listen to kristin welker now. kristin. >> martin, you see the president and first lady walking down the reviewing stand. sasha and malia behind them.
. the center for science and the public interest, a non-profit consumer advocacy group says sugary drinks are the number one source of calories in the american diet. they put out their famous version of the coca-cola bear called the real bear. ♪ sugar, sugar, so good, so good, sugar ♪ >> coca-cola said "obesity is complex and requires partnership and collaboration to help solve it. we have an important role to play in the effort to find solutions that work for everybody." let's bring in our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. so i know it's a tough topic. coke says it can play an important role in america's fight against obesity, it says it's decreased the calories in its products. in middle schools it sells juices instead of cans of coke. it says it's doing its part. what's the big deal? leave us alone? >> i think that's part of it. there's a fear of regulation, we've seen it, you've talked about it in your piece from what mayor bloomberg is doing, the center for science and public interest has been very critical of what coke and other soft drink companies have done. it's n
. this is not based in science. martha: here's another issue that comes up with the children, alan. if you live in a family that has guns, hunters or has guns for their own security, that is how you grew up, what is the message you're getting from president obama if your dad and your mom believe that safe gun ownership is, their second amendment right and something they should not be a shamed of? >> no one is saying that. we don't know what the president is going to say. that is different issue whether or not it is appropriate for children to be present. that is a very separate issue. i don't believe the president's ever said that hunters should not have access to guns or take away guns from hunters. that is not at all what is being discussed today. and has nothing to do whether kids should be present. martha: i disagree. i think the message is sent to children, if they're raised in a home that has guns for security or hunting, that the message is that you're not like us and it is divisive to a certain extent. >> he is not talking about taking guns. >> hold on, it is pretty simple. let's not us
"the christian science monitor." she is the white house reporter for that publication. bachus through the president's day. >> it starts with a religious -- walk us through the president's day. guest: it will start with a religious service, near lafayette square. then they had up to capitol hill. as you said, 11:20, that will be the swearing in. i think that will take place closer to 11:30. then he makes his speech at 11:50. after that, they head into the capitol building for an inaugural luncheon. that is followed by a parade down pennsylvania avenue. in the evening, there are two inaugural balls this year. one is a commander in chief's all for the military, followed by the big inaugural ball. they have cut back from 10 to two. the second inaugural ball will be quite big. it is not quite as much downsizing as they are making it out to be. >> the president is only going to one location? guest: according to the schedule, he is at the first ball at 8:45, and at 9:10, he's at the other ball. he is a quarter years older, maybe he wants an earlier night. host: does the president of many tra
with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers will need to equip our children for the future, building the roads, networks, and research laboratories that will bring the jobs to our shores. now more than ever we must do these things together, as one nation, one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steal our resolve and prove our resilience. a decade of war is ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities of this world but that demands. youth and driver, diversity and open this, an analyst capacity for risk -- an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. we will see that so long as we see this together. host: the editorial page from "usa today." they wrote this about president obama, saying that a decade of war is ending -- host: fred barnes, executive editor of "the weekly standard," wrote this in the opinion state -- opinion section of "the wall street journal." host: mr obama was less explicit but his emphasis was on the
of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build roads and networks and research labs that will bring new job and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow earns most, we are made for this moment and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together. [applse] for we, the people, understand that our country can not succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. [applause] we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle c
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resilientcy is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering cals make the coastle zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those umph bumper stick thears say stop plate tectonics. huges have an effect on the rate -- humans have the an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss anbar yur island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendati
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the overwhelming challenge of science but no one can avoid the crippling fire, droughts and more powerful storms. >> reporter: speaking on martin luther king day president obama made history by using the word gay and saying that -- the president, vice president and families at journaled for the congressional lunch before the walk . >> i'm very encouraged. >> reporter: in of the people we talked to today in the crowd said this felt like a very different experience than the inauguration four years ago. coming up we'll tell you why they said that and take you into the crowd during the inauguration and parade. >>> the inauguration also featured the first latino, the first gay and the youngest person ever to serve as the inaugural poet. >> and always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop and every window of one country, all of us facing the stars. hope. >> miami poet is the son of cuban exile. the poem was called one today and illustrated how americans share common experiences. blanco also remembered the victims of the newtown school shootings. >>> former republican presidential cand
to the threat of climate change. >> some may still deny the overwhelming challenge of science but no one can avoid the crippling fire, droughts and more powerful storms. >> reporter: speaking on martin luther king day president obama made history by using the word gay and saying that -- the president, vice president and families at journaled for the congressional lunch before the walk . >> i'm very encouraged. >> reporter: in of the people we talked to today in the crowd said this felt like a very different experience than the inauguration four years ago. coming up we'll tell you why they said that and take you into the crowd during the inauguration and parade. >>> the inauguration also featured the first latino, the first gay and the youngest person ever to serve as the inaugural poet. >> and always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop and every window of one country, all of us facing the stars. hope. >> miami poet is the son of cuban exile. the poem was called one today and illustrated how americans share common experiences. blanco also remembered the victims of the newto
the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. >> i want to bring in our panel of van jones, sally quinn, margaret hoover, and cornell belcher. were you surprised to hear him talk about climate change, and really kind of go on about it? we haven't heard much over the last four years about it? >> i was certainty surprised. i don't think we have really done a good job in society right now of dealing with this question. you have a dust bowl forming right now. we have one of the biggest droughts since really the dust bowl, since the great depression, before the great depression. we had wildfires like we have never seen before all across the west. we had this massive storm, and no discussion about it. i think that was one of the great failures of the american political system, the media system, not to address this. meanwhile, the scientists are getting more and more concerned and more and more in unity. now there's greater unity about the question of humans causing global warming, and unity among scien
. much -- good science experiment. >> but that's what's going on in your drink. >> okay. >> so you let that sit for about 10 or 15 minutes and then turn on the hot water for about a minute because you want it to go all the way through the plumbing system. >> okay. >> and if you do this preventative, then you won't have to call a plumber. >> does it drive you crazy when you go to the big box stores and you see these organic cleaners for tens and 20s of dollars and you can do that at home. >> and vinegar is fabulous for -- i know if you have stainless steel over there. i hate it because i mean i love the oven itself. but stainless steel? >> yeah it shows everything. >> it shows everything. so to clean stainless steel, windows, mirrors, again, you can use straight rubbing alcohol or vinegar. >> okay. okay. >> and the newspaper. oh my gosh is that the "washington post"? >> it is. >> i wonder if i'm in there today. >> it's a new way to recycle right? >> it is. now some people don't like this because they say it gets newsprint on their hands. but wash your hands. or wear rubber gloves. but w
:00 eastern we will examine precisely that. why we cheat, the psychology and science behind cheating. we're all over it. don't miss it tomorrow. that's it for me here m i'm brooke baldwin in atlanta. now we go to washington to wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins now. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, breaking news. americans held hostage in a deadly terrorist attack in algeria. we'll have the latest. >>> also, the president of the nra is here in "the situation room." we're getting his reaction to the sweeping proposals against gun violence. and the presidential inauguration only five days away. we'll take you inside the law enforcement command center working to keep him safe. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> let's get to the breaking news. a deadly terrorist attack on a gas field in eastern algeria near the libyan border. some of the more than 40 hostages seized have been released but a number of them are still being held, including americans. the state department confirms those americans are affiliated with the oil gian
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and warn out dogmas that for far too long that strangled our politics, but our time of standing pat of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions, that time has surely passed. >> we all remember that inspiring call from president obama exactly four years, to end partisan politics. if you were keeping score, and we are, that promise would actually fall into the incomplete category. promises considered, mostly clept, more jobs and a middle class tax break,
. >> center for science and public interest is handing out the extreme eating award to chain restaurants. what the award means and what they are trying to do. >>> it's a big step towards revitalizing the west side as an arts and entertainment district. i will have details on the new every man theater. ♪ ♪ i'm halfway to your heart ♪ you have to let me know ♪ so i don't make my worst mistake ♪ ♪ turn around and let you go [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. made with sweet, smooth peanut butter and salted, roasted peanuts. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. whathat needs refreshing?nd new year, and a room we can work with a new collection of carpet that proves durable can be softer than ever. we can get for less and spread that softness even further. turns out, we can do even more than we thought we could. because this is the year of doing. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. roll out the new year with 10% off or 24 months special financing with your home depot credit card.
science abstract, they say that not only does it affect psychological development in young -- not only young males but also young women, but there are physiological changes in the way the body responds to arousal regarding violence. i mean, you look at this study and look at other studies, it's all out there. and it's obvious. and i think the denial of this from people on the left i think hurts their cause. >> yeah. >> like we've said from the very beginning, this is a very big all-encompassing problem that we have to face together. it's not left and right. >> not a denial. as a guy who has a business background who wants to solve a problem, the more you focus on video games, the more you let the nra off the hook to solve this problem, you get the guns. i hate those video games. i'm not saying it's an either/or, but sometimes it is an either/or. that's the solution. >> donny, i don't want to let people like quentin tarantino off the hook. i don't want to let people like your friends at activision off the hook. people that make billions of dollars selling mind-numbing violence -- >> i h
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. what's good for the pot... is even better for the cup. new single serve cafe collections from maxwell house. now available for use in the keurig k-cup brewer. always good to the last drop. so will bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. use less, with bounty select-a-size. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >>> when the united states was openly mulling the prospect of going to war with iraq, people inside iraq who were enemies of saddam, people who wanted the u.s. to invade iraq and overthrow him found that the u.s. government, and in some cases
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this was the scene earlier today on the house floor. watch. >> we the people of the united states in order to form a more perfect union establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and to our posterity to ordain and establish this constitution for the united states of america. >> now, he did not write that himself. yes, it was constitution day on the floor of the house of representatives. read the constitution day. remember two years ago when republicans took over the house, john boehner became speaker for the first time, they decided to make a big show out of reading the constitution page by page on the floor of the house as one of their first acts? well, they apparently enjoyed that so much a couple of years ago when they did it the first time that they decided to bring it back. so today for more than an hour, members of the house took turns reading a section of the
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. weaker in review from the ingraham angle segment tonight. ms. laura causing controversy by saying this. >> the more i think about it, the more it seems that collin powell's appearance on meet the press was well-coordinated with the white house. with his deer friend with whom he campaigned, barack obama. when i hear an african-american president make comments about they don't like to socialize with me they demonize me? i think we are playing the victim card here. playing -- maybe playing the race card. it works well with that -- that collin obama narrative. >> bill: joining us now from washington is miss laura. let me just set this up. collin powell goes out on meet the press i don't know whether he did anything else. his main intent was to say that chuck hagel is a good guy and should be confirmed as secretary of state. right? they they trot him out. so obviously, somebody had to ask him to do that and you believe that it came from within the white house? >> well, yeah. what better person really to go
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> with hotwire's low prices, i can afford to visit chicago for my first big race and l.a. for my best friend's wedding. because when hotels have unsold rooms, they use hotwire so i got my hotels for half-price! >> men: ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com >> bill: back of the book segment tonight. watters world the movie edition. as you may know the oscar nominations are out. let's be honest. movies not what they used to be. so we sent jesse watters out to ask regular folks their opinions on the best and worst films of all time. >> all time greatest movie, according to you is, what? >> one of my favorites is fight club. one of those twisted kind of movies. >> you do not talk about fight club. >> don't punch me. >> the hobbit. >> it may have had a few things added but it stuck to the plot. >> you are a smart kid. >> thanks. >> shawshank redemption. no one can argue me, no one. >> i will be damn. >> did you cry when you saw shaw sank. >> who didn't cry wh
degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math. we need to expand -- we need to expand the h1vb visa program. 5, immigration reform must include an effective and efficient employment verification system. such a system can and must prevent unlawful employment, a record as employers and employees who play by the rules and protect america's fundamental rights. 6, we must protect our borders through smart enforcement. according to the migration policy institute, immigration enforcement takes its share of federal law enforcement spending. today undocumented migration is below zero. we will not meet our immigration challenge through enforcement alone. the goal of our immigration enforcement policy should be the removal -- we should deport serious offenders. we should not deport people whose serious crime is a lack of papers. by deporting such people we remove the trust between law-enforcement and the immigrant community. if you break up families and of five children of the love and protection of their families all in our zeal to enforce the law according to data, three-fourths of thos
lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs. we'll harness harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. and we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. all this we can do. all this we will do. now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions, who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done, what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose and necessity to courage. what the cynics that to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them, that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington and the nation were witness again today to the quadrennial pomp and color of a presidential inauguration. it marked the public start to the second obama administration, and it featured presidential appeals to extend prosperity and full freedoms to all americans. as the sun rose over the nation's capital on this monday hundreds of thousands of people began descending on the national mall to witness the occasion. officials estimated 500-700,000 attendees. that was far fewer than four years ago when nearly two million turned out. but today's crowd gave no hint of diminished enthusiasm for the 44th president after a first term that saw bruising battles over health care, financial reform, deficits a
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